Radiometric dating of planets

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Some evidence is also presented to show that radiometric results that are in agreement with the accepted geological time scale are selectively published in preference to those results that are not in agreement.The geological time scale and an age for the Earth of 4.5 b.y.Despite this, the momentum gained in the two decades prior to 1972 has made 4.5 b.y.a popularly accepted “universal constant” even though the foundations on which it was based have been virtually removed.To establish a surface history, it is necessary to determine the sequence of various geologic events and, if possible, their duration.Two basic types of dating are possible: absolute and relative.] One of the major goals of planetary exploration is to determine the surface histories of the solid planets and satellites.

In practice, this procedure requires an accurate assessment of the initial abundances of the isotopes produced in the radioactive decay.

Nevertheless, there is substantial evidence that the Earth and the other bodies of the Solar System are 4.5-4.6 billion years old, and that the Milky Way Galaxy and the Universe are older still.

The principal evidence for the antiquity of Earth and its cosmic surroundings is: Spontaneous breakdown or decay of atomic nuclei, termed radioactive decay, is the basis for all radiometric dating methods.

Geologist Ralph Harvey and historian Mott Greene explain the principles of radiometric dating and its application in determining the age of Earth.

As the uranium in rocks decays, it emits subatomic particles and turns into lead at a constant rate.

But for humans whose life span rarely reaches more than 100 years, how can we be so sure of that ancient date? Even the Greeks and Romans realized that layers of sediment in rock signified old age.

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